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Catharine Young’s Latest Bill Passes Committee

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

Today, Catharine Young’s bill, S2281, passed the Housing committee despite objections from Senators Adriano Espaillat and Liz Krueger that it would weaken tenants’ rights.

The bill would give a landlord the right (but not the obligation) to essentially forge the signature on a lease renewal that a rent regulated tenant failed to sign, even if the tenant had a valid reason for not signing the lease. Landlords could use this ability to, for example, insert an illegal rent hike into a tenant’s lease, and then put that lease into effect without the tenant’s consent, which would give the landlord more power to evict the tenant for not complying with the new lease that he or she “signed”. Tenants would gain no rights whatsoever from the legislation.

Catharine Young Refuses to Let NYC Manage Its Own Housing Laws

Friday, May 9th, 2014

The Urstadt Law, which was passed by Albany lawmakers in 1971, took away New York City’s right to implement its own housing laws. Although NYC’s new mayor, Bill de Blasio, has called for a repeal of the Urstadt Law, Senator Catharine Young has so far refused to allow this to happen.

It’s easy to see why. If the lawmakers of New York City were allowed to make the laws of New York City, then the landlords would have no use for Catharine Young. This would mean that all of the money she gets from NYC landlords (which greatly exceeds her actual salary from the state) would disappear.

So it should come as no surprise that every time a senator (such as Liz Krueger, who actually represents part of NYC) tries to introduce a “home rule” bill to let the city control its own housing laws, Catharine Young and her friends in Albany simply kill it.

Despite the fact that she’s bankrolled by NYC landlords, Catharine Young actually has the nerve to pretend that she wants to bring down rents in New York City. In an official statement to Crain’s newspaper, Young wrote:

“The best way to bring down rents is to expand the number of housing units. It is a basic supply and demand issue… Changing the Urstadt Law would prove to be a disaster for the future of New York City’s housing market.”

The full article is available here.

Watch Young kill S1492 in this video from a Housing committee meeting last year (3:15):

Catharine Young Wants the RGB to Give Yearly Rent Increases to Mitchell-Lama Tenants

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

At yesterday’s meeting of the senate housing committee, Catharine Young introduced S5084, a bill that would provide automatic yearly rent increases for tenants living in Mitchell-Lama housing in New York City. Furthermore, the bill would increase the surcharges paid by residents who are above the income threshold. Finally, the bill would increase the income limits for Mitchell-Lama tenants.

This is exactly what low-to-moderate income families don’t need — more competition from other, higher-income families applying for the same very limited supply of housing (where very long waiting lists are already the norm), while simultaneously making these apartments less affordable over time through yearly RGB increases. But this is an amazing deal for companies that own and operate these housing units, because they would get automatic rent increases without even asking for them, plus they would get extra surcharges to boot!

Senator Adriano Espaillat cast the single negative vote (3:13 in the video).

Landlords 3, Tenants 0: Catharine Young Passes Three Bills in Senate

Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

Today, the Senate passed three of the bills that Senator Catharine Young introduced in the April 30th housing committee meeting:

S5041A – This bill would give landlords the ability to evict rent stabilized tenants if they fail to file a city/state tax return, or vote in the wrong place, and also would allow a landlord to challenge a tenant’s primary residency at any time during the lease. A version of this bill had previously passed the Senate on June 22nd, 2011, but died in Assembly.

S5152 – This bill would would allow a landlord to evict any rent regulated tenant, who is not disabled or over the age of 62, if the landlord’s immediate family wanted to live there, even for just a short time, without demonstrating any necessity for such occupancy.

S6472 – This bill would allow a landlord to increase the stabilized rent on an apartment by 20% in the event that the residing tenant vacates or dies, and his/her family wishes to continue the lease. Furthermore, the bill would limit succession rights to one generation.

All three bills are currently in Assembly.

Due to an apparent technical glitch, there is no sound on the Senate’s video of the session. However, the full transcript can be read here. In addition, we do have following debate on the S5041A bill between Catharine Young and Gustavo Rivera, who represents District 33 in the Bronx (which, unlike Young’s own district, is actually affected by her bill):

Christmas in April! Catharine Young Gives 5 Presents to Landlords

Monday, April 30th, 2012

At today’s meeting of the Senate Committee on Housing, Construction and Community Development, Senator Catharine Young introduced five more bills that attack the rights of rent stabilized tenants in New York City.

S5041A – This bill would give landlords the ability to evict rent stabilized tenants if they fail to file a city/state tax return, or vote in the wrong place, and also would allow a landlord to challenge a tenant’s primary residency at any time during the lease. A version of this bill had previously passed the Senate on June 22nd, 2011, but died in Assembly. (0:50 in video)

S5152 – This bill would would allow a landlord to evict any rent regulated tenant, who is not disabled or over the age of 62, if the landlord’s immediate family wanted to live there, even for just a short time, without demonstrating any necessity for such occupancy. (6:49 in video)

S6472 – This bill would allow a landlord to increase the stabilized rent on an apartment by 20% in the event that the residing tenant vacates or dies, and his/her family wishes to continue the lease. Furthermore, the bill would limit succession rights to one generation. (9:55 in video)

S6473 – This bill would make it easier for an apartment to become destabilized via high income, by changing the formula for calculating the $200,000 minimum annual income. Instead of requiring an income above $200,000 for each of two consecutive years, the average income over the two year period would be used in the calculation. (12:59 in video)

S6515 – This bill would eliminate a rent regulated tenant’s right to a two-year lease renewal. All lease renewals would therefore be for a term of only one year. (14:53 in video)